Dying Light Trainer Guide

Downloading and Using a Dying Light Trainer Guide

There are many things to know about Dying Light’s Trainer mods. Between either using them to test new strategies against bosses or just messing around, you should download one.

Nonetheless, let’s dive into the purpose of a Trainer, how to download one, and how it can assist you on your next play-through.

In this Dying Light Trainer Guide, we will discuss a few things about Dying Light trainers and how they can help you out in a pinch or allow you to test something you otherwise couldn’t. Of course, I’ll recommend some of my favorite trainers and give you tips on how to find the best one for your needs! 

What is a Trainer & why I Use One

A trainer is something that people use as a mod menu to either modify their play-through, test builds, or even set up boss battles as you go. Ultimately how you use a trainer is up to you.

Yes, some people use it to cheat, toggle god mod or give themselves a leg up in the game. However, something good to know is that I am a completionist, so I understand that some people don’t use mods or trainers. 

Granted, I’ve used a mod menu before on Nexus that offered a similar aspect as a trainer. However, the mod doesn’t exist anymore.

Regardless, you can always find some exciting things in Dying light, and I love the game. 

I will say maybe I like the console edition a bit more, only for the sake of controllers. Aside from that, PC modding is always where it’s at. So stick around, and I’ll give you some pros and cons of a trainer and why you should use one!

Some Pros of a Trainer

  • Trainers are common among communities outside of major modding networks.
  • Some mod menus can also function as trainers if you feel like you need security in your downloads.
  • You can Spawn things into practice.
  • Training your character and play styles are easier with a trainer

Some Cons

  • Downloading a trainer can be complicated
  • Depending on the trainer, it may be sometimes impossible to use a mod sorter.

Think about where You Get Your Trainer

Dying Light Trainer

I recommend using the trainer below. I’ve seen some videos on how trainers work. If you don’t like the trainer listed below and don’t feel like trusting Nexus Mods, Mods DB, and WeMod, are great ways to find Dying Light trainers. 

Nexus is an established modding community with regulations on how to download a trainer. Mod DB is a good substitute for Nexus and allows more freedom for the modding community.

WeMod is good, too; alternatively, if you are feeling like becoming a part of another community, Gamers Underground is an excellent fit.

WeMod is interesting in its own right, especially since it’s run by people who know in-depth modding. Like Gamers Underground, however, instead of focusing on regulated mods, they focus on creating trainers for games like Dying Light or the Fallout series.

I recommend using WeMod mostly because of their direct association with trainers. Also, they have more knowledge when it comes to coding, allowing them to have easier installation guides that come with their trainer.

Another good thing about WeMod is its growing community, so if you feel like you aren’t getting much out of any other site WeMod is an excellent fit. Ultimately it’s up to you what site you use and whether or not you want to use a trainer or a regular mod menu.

Downloading a Trainer from Nexus

I would say that Nexus, even though it is a mainstream kind of website, has many tools to help you find what you are looking for. To start downloading a trainer off of Nexus, go to https://www.nexusmods.com/dyinglight and create an account.

  • First, look up the mod menu at the top right (usually, most mod menus have trainers in them)
  • After you have found the menu you are looking for, just hit the download button. If you have Vortexor, the original Nexus Mod Manager, you may use download with Vortex or Nexus.
  • If you have the mod manager installed, you’d have to make sure you enable the file in a vortex or your mod manager. If you downloaded it manually, that’s okay. Just go to steam, steamapps, Common, and Dying Light.
  • Pin your Dying light Folder to your quick menu by left-clicking on the folder. From the drop-down menu, select pin to the quick bar.
  • From there, go to your downloads, and left-click. “Extract” to your Desktop or Dying light folder.
  • Read the Readme.txt file inside the extracted Zip, or file first. From there or the mod page should have step-by-step instructions.
  • Once you have read the readme.txt, drag the mod menu folder into your dying light folder.
  • From there, you can continue with the baseline folder.

Pros

  • Simple to use mod menus that act like trainers
  • Has a large community of people to help you.

Cons

  • Requires a Nexus Account,
  • The Trainer usually comes as a mod menu.
  • May require other mods.

Downloading a Trainer off of ModDB

Downloading a Trainer off of ModDB

 

Here’s a quick rundown of the cancer that is ModDB. I love it and hate it sometimes.

So bear with me here. You’ll need an account. And look up the trainer or mod menu you want.

  • Once you’ve found the trainer or mod menu, hit download. (Under the files tab)
  • Here’s where it’ll get tricky, you can either add it to the above mod managers like Vortex, or you may add it to another mod manager.

Just like any other manual installation, this is no different. You can use the Readme.txt that comes with most mods, or you can look below for a manual installation.

Pros

  • Smaller community and more precise with mod menus
  • Doesn’t usually require a Mod manager

Cons

  • Some people scam you on ModDb
  • Trainers are there but need Winzip, etc, to open.

Downloading a Trainer Website

Downloading a trainer is simple. All you have to do is go to your browser and search for Dying Light Trainer. Alternatively, you can look below this article for a link or even try nexus mods.

  • From the website or page you want, you should be able to download that specific trainer and add it to your game. It could take a while, depending on your internet connection.
  • Next, you should open up your folders page and find your Dying Light Main Folder. This is usually under Steamapps/Common/DyingLight for steam users. Next open either DW_DLC1 or DW_DLC39 and move the page to the right side of the screen.

(Depending on what you download, whether it be from the Nexus or a website, it should be noted that they may differ.

Keep that in mind when looking through each trainer and their capabilities. Also, note that some people want to scam you with fake trainers that may damage your computer.)

For this next stage, you may need to install WinRar or Seven-zip on your computer if you haven’t already.

  • Once you’ve settled where your DW_DLC1 or DW_DLC39 folder is, go to downloads and open up the file you downloaded.
  • From there, you can split the screen between the file you opened and the Dying light directory.
  • Move the DataEn.pak into the DW_DLC1 or DW_DLC39 folder. After that has been completed, to verify that the data file has been moved, start your dying light, and load your save.

Pros

  • Trainer creators are usually Dedicated to a game,
  • You can find more diversity online.

Cons

  • The chance of a virus being downloaded increases.
  • Trojan horses can also be hidden in the trainer.

Other Things to Note

Dying Light Trainer

It is good to know that even if you have DW_DLC1, and DW_DLC39, you should know that putting the Data folder in DW_DLC39 is better than putting it in the DLC1 folder. Check if you have one or both of these items when you are scrounging in your DyingLight folder.

If you only have DLC1 and not DLC39, do not fret. Just put the DataEn.Pak in DLC1. If you load it up again, check and see your files to ensure there aren’t two Data files between your DLCs.

If there are, delete the file in one of them. Having two of these Data Files confuses the code, stopping the game either from running or it could cause in-game script errors.

One last and final thing you should do is ensure that your game has no missing files. Sometimes, for any mod or trainer to work, it needs a particular file in order to work. Keep that in mind when you download anything into a steam game.

Now, if you use any of the trainers below, make sure you see if there’s any installation guide. Usually, this takes the form of a Txt file, making it easy to read. Make sure you read that first before you make an installation of any kind.

Loading Your Trainer Up for the First Time

Now with that Jargon out of the way, you can run your Dying Light again to see if it works with the trainer. Load up your most recent save and press the ESC key. If a menu pops up, you are good to go.

Now, to understand the purpose of a trainer, we must discover what it is used for. A trainer is something that allows you to modify a game and lets you experiment with things that aren’t supposed to be messed with.

Betwixt numerous guns, ability points, and spawning events, you can only assume that you are just messing around or want to venture into a hells-cape with many bugs. Because of this, let’s list some neat things you can do with your trainer.

For one, you can spawn in events, which can add either bosses or other entities that make combat unique. That means more things that you can either test weapons on or discover new techniques that allow you to achieve more in your survival.

Secondly, it will enable you to test more player-related things like EXP or reload times. That means you can experiment with level modifiers in your gaming experience.

Finally, you can use the trainer to acquire new weapons or ammunition that you could use to train yourself for boss fights, etc.

To make matters more interesting, you can spawn in hordes of AI that are either scuffed bandits or zombies that will destroy each other and you. If you don’t like that, you can teleport across the map to different locations.

That allows you to either find a new zone to test in or, will enable you to get out of spots you usually wouldn’t be able to. Topping that off, if you can think it, the trainer can most likely do it.

Don’ts of a Dying Light Trainer

Don'ts of a Dying Light Trainer

When you download and use a trainer, think of it as downloading a new set of code, or if you have messed with a script extender before, think of that.

A trainer can easily mess up your game, especially if either you didn’t install it correctly or have mods that do not flow with the code.

A good correction for this is redownloading a clean version of Dying Light. You can see if it’s your mods or improper installation. Keep the installation clean and install the Trainer to test it. If it works, you can see which mods are loaded with the trainer broken.

I know it seems terrible, but you go through two hundred mods with thirty script errors on fallout new Vegas and tell me how I feel. Trust me, it’s a pain, but you should be good once you set it up.

Here are some common-sense tips I use when downloading mods from anywhere. Check and see what the mod adds to the game.

Does the trainer or modification I want contradict my mod or trainer? Is there something that combines both mods for trainers?

From there, you should be able to determine where that mod or trainer lined up on your list. Make sure you don’t have mods that do the same thing because codes can easily break or turn into errors.

Download the Right Trainer, not a Virus

the Right Trainer, not a Virus

Ultimately, how you use the trainer you download is up to you. Some things to remember are that you can get a trainer anywhere online.

Each trainer that you may download online will be different from the others. Also, I recommend mod menus so you aren’t boggled with the complexity of each mod that you may install on top of the trainer.

Keep in mind your trainer’s limitations too. Sometimes a mod is only as good as the computer it runs on. Take, for example, my laptop with Arma 2 Oa. It can only run so many before it breaks your computer. A link will be below for you to download a trainer of your own.

Make sure you check if a site or its download is malware. Something else I should note is that your computer may think it is even if it isn’t. If that’s the case, and you are concerned with the download, look up the file extension and find out if your Dying Light trainer is indeed malware.

I hope you have read this article and understood the benefits of having a trainer for your next Dying Light play-through and that you are ready for the next challenge. With that out of the way, I wish you the best Good night, and Good luck!

FAQs

Question: What is a Trainer?

Answer: A trainer is something you download, whether an event system or cheat, that allows you more character flexibility in-game.

Question: How Do I Install a Trainer?

Answer: That Depends on where you get one. you may also be able to use Nexus mods as a substitute for trainers if you don’t like the idea of using a questionable third party.

Question: What Could I Do with a Trainer?

Answer: You can do almost anything with a trainer. Either between spawned in weapons and events to other things like teleportation between areas.

Question: How Would I Know if My Trainer is Malware and not a Mod?

Answer: To check if there’s a program running on my PC, I look up the .exe or script in your task manager. You can look up each program and see if it is. You can also use any anti-virus software to check too, but be very careful.

Question: Should I Clean Install My Dying Light Beforehand?

Answer: I would, but that’s to ensure you have the files in arrangement. It’s entirely up to you, though. I only do a clean install if I have too many mods.

Link to Trainer or Mod Sites:

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